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Monday, January 7, 2013

Korean military digs itself into a deeper hole with celebrity soldiers


A picture has been circulating online of a couple of celebrity soldiers taking a break while dressed out of uniform and carrying around luxury bags as well as accessorized in sunglasses, playing on their cellphones while smoking, etc, adding to the fire that is the current army scandal with its perks.

Although their faces were blurred out, a few were able to track down non-censored photos and identified them as Outsider, Jung Kyung Ho, and Kim Hye Sung.

Once the controversy over the picture got out of hand, the agency of one of the celebrities in question clarified that the event they were performing for had asked that they wear suits, which explains the bags and the accessories. But, while on their way there, it had also been really hot while they were out taking their break so they were granted permission to dress out of their uniforms and into comfier clothing, which is when they were caught on camera. As for their cellphones, a guide did not follow them to the trip so they were also granted cellphone usage for communication. They concluded the explanation with an apology for the misunderstanding.

Article: 'non-uniform controversy' Celebrity soldier perks? "Misunderstanding... We'll pay more attention... We apologize"

Source: Star News via Nate

1. [+687, -14] "It had also been really hot while they were out taking their break so they were granted permission to dress out of their uniforms and into comfier clothing" This is not called a misunderstanding but a perk and a privilege

2. [+605, -13] Do they really call this an explanation? They were allowed to dress out of uniform purely because it was too hot? I'm pretty sure dressing in and out of clothes would've been even hotter! Why are non-celebrities required to stay in uniforms? Why can't we just get rid of celebrity soldiers all together? How can any active duty soldier serve knowing that all of these perks are not being granted to them?

3. [+519, -12] They call it a misunderstanding~~ㅋㅋㅋㅋ If they're really apologetic, they should go back and serve again

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Article: Military responds to celebrity soldiers spotted out of uniform "It is possible to wear normal clothing if granted permission"

Source: Star News via Nate

1. [+425, -9] If the military can grant permission for anything they want, then they can grant any celebrity exemption from service. We're asking why these permissions were given, don't give us an answer we already know you fu*kers

2. [+340, -12] Fu*k, they're just evading all of the questions now aren't they ㅋ The majority of the country believes this to be a very real issue and they need to be revising these regulations.

3. [+301, -11] The military is just digging themselves a deeper hole the more they come out with statements. There are so many soldiers that work through unjust services - a normal service would be a dream to them.

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Article: The reality of celebrity soldiers controversy 'personal items to even smoking?'

Source: Hanguk Ilbo via Nate

1. [+97, -2] Any active duty soldier granted permission for personal items are only allowed soap or cleansing foam, and even then, they get taken and thrown away if they get caught. Luxury bags?? Cellphones?? You go straight to the guardhouse if you're caught with any of those. And the purpose of these celebrity soldiers is to perform and raise your morale but I never saw one such performance during my two years of service.

2. [+95, -2] A Louis Vuitton in the army... What the f*k is going on?

3. [+94, -2] Fu*k when I was a sergeant, they cut my vacation day because I wore a personal underwear ㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋ

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33 comments:

  1. SMH. Celebrities need to suck it up and the military needs to tighten its rules. This is NOT okay, it's unfair to the other soldiers. It makes me really sick, as someone who has had friends go off to the military. -___\

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  2. netizens need to get over it. conscription is shit anyway lol.

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  3. Outsider? nooo, well, I'm being biased.
    But that is so incredibly unfair to the non-celebrity soldiers that I don't even have any words to defend these guys.

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  4. very idealist of you. just get rid of conscription and avoid inevitable favouritism of celebrities altogether; it's the closest thing you're going to get to justice in this situation. otherwise just accept that, like in almost every other aspect of life, famous people have it easier.

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  5. Oh lawd~
    Everyone have to go to the military. I get that it's hard on them, no one want to do it. They'll go under harsh training, get bully by seniors I get it, BUT~ It happen, alot of people endure it, not just you guys. Military need to stop favoring them anyway. If they're not so lenient, this wouldn't happen.



    Conscription isn't going away anytime soon anyway since the two countries are technically is still at war.

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  6. I don't agree with conscription, however, I don't think it'll end anytime soon. I don't really see why celebrities are being put on a pedestal and given perks when it comes to the military, where stuff like this should come with seniority or high rank..

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  7. LOL! When I was in the army, I actually get punished if I even say the phrase "it's hot", right on the spot. No arguments.

    And if these pictures are true... wow. What a bunch of pussies these celebrities are.

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  8. Like u know nothing about the life of ent soldiers. Why u act like u know everything and swear at them knetz?

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  9. Just get ride of them already, they are useless, are treated like princess and after they leave they start with the "how hard it was, but they did what was right" bullshit.

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  10. "3. [+94, -2] Fu*k when I was a sergeant, they cut my vacation day because I wore a personal underwear ㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋ" it's sad" loool .. it's sad.. but lol

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  11. I'm still not seeing the point of military being mandatory for Korean men.

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  12. there isn't one; that's the main problem here. people should be focusing on the fact that conscription as a whole doesn't have a conducive place in a developed society, but that falls too far out of their comfort zone of blaming idols for all of the military-related problems.

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  13. sorry, but the bigger problem here is that all able korean men are expected to endure that, not that idols are getting it easier than regular people.

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  14. As a foreigner it is my perception, that the SK army loves to utilize the celebs. They are vastly used for pro-army propaganda. AFAIK none of the celebs made the exceptional rules they are treated with. The army needs their cooperation to get support, they are willing to grant some benefits. This is a normal, everyday situation. As for the celebs having it easier. I just remembered Joo Jin Mo's Taxi interview. He said, he wasn't able to leave his appartment to shop due to fans. He knew some shops open as late as 2 am where he was able to go out to. Doesn't sound like an easy life to me.

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  15. I don't know why people keep saying abt getting rid of conscription. who is going to defend south Korea when there is war? you?

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  16. Exactly, I don't get either, Korea is in war people!What will you do then? leave hate messages for NK on the Internet? yeah, that would help...sigh

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  17. Does South Korea not have soldiers who enlist on there on free will and would want to defend their country?

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  18. Now that I know about these things, all the male celebs who have talked about how hard the army was for them on variety shows seem pathetic to me.

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  19. ㅗ(-.-;)ㅗ

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  20. Compulsory military service has only been in effect since 1948, the year South Korea became its own sovereign state.


    While all men age 18-35 are required to enlist in one of the ROK's military services some choose to reenlist, which is voluntary. High ranking officers, for example, are some of those types of people.


    And really... You're required only two years of compulsory military service. It's nowhere near as long as the 8-year contracts US military have to sign, not counting the 2 years of reserve duty after serving active duty.

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  21. You'll get soliders who are in it as a career.

    If a war with North Korea was to take place, you seriously think South Korea has an advantage because of TWO YEAR army training? NK army is trained for years and years so these 2 years don't even make a big difference lbr. NK, America and China have the biggest and strongest armies and what do they have in common....they don't force you.

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  22. Whilst I don't agree with conscription, this situation of celebrity soldiers getting special treatment is too unfair! Either give everyone the same treatment or stop conscription.

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  23. Ok. It IS expected for all able korean men to endure that. That's why its part of Army training and not a weekend spa.

    By having excuses not to endure "what all able korean men are expected to endure" idols ARE getting it easier than regular people. So the problem is interconnected. "All able korean men are expected to endure that but celebrities are getting perks that make their lives easier compared to regular people."

    One of the recent new recruits will Sing and Dance his way through the war with a musical. So yeah these celebrities are pussies.

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  24. Please! What's with all the talk about getting rid of conscription. Just so you know many countries have conscription and for a few, females also need to serve. All you gonna condem all those countries and their government? Smh.

    Anyway the point of conscription is to give the regular male citizens a feel of being a soldier , so in the case of a state emergency , whereby normal citizens have to be deployed to fight for the country (not just SK but for countries that generally may engage in wars or do not have an incredibly large army) at least those guys won't be doing useless things and just screaming for help. Help defend the country.

    Frankly conscription is generally a good thing. And most males also treat it as a rite of passage from boys to men.

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  25. I'm pretty sure there are thousands and thousands of men who'd be willing, especially the men who would reenlist. It's not like they'd be outnumbered if it wasn't mandatory.

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  26. Why do you non korean bitches even give a shit about this?? You will never understand. Just stop please

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  27. As a Korean who really admires a voluntary system like U.S., I really hate the fact that Korea is taking conscription system, but atleast I can explain it why.. Because then government can use one regular soldiers for only paying him 60~90 dollars per MONTH depends on their rank... Money is always the problem... Korea is not really wealthy country who can spend billions and trillions of dollars on Military like U.S... If government change the system like U.S. only taking the people who's volunteering, then no one's ever going to enlist, unless they pay it like a regular job(atleast more that 1000 dollars per month), but number of soldiers that is required to guard South Korea against North as a military strategical point of view, volunteering numbers wont reach high enough... And money cost expensive... That's why gov' is using conscription... Because of North Korea... But as a personal point of view, Ofcourse I hate this fact that we have to suffer for 2 years with only getting shitty payment.,..Just like I suffered...

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  28. And yeah, I also think that in next 20-30 years they have to minimize the size of number of soldiers, and put more money high-tech equipment and weapon... In a modern war, having more number of soldiers are getting less important, but having minor expert soldiers who is very skillful on what they supposed to do(who's been worked&trained for 8-10 years), with expensive high-tech weapons, is much important... And government is slowly changing that.. I know they are in process.. But still Korea is the country that has too much mountains.. You have to have enough ground soldiers...

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  29. I honestly dont think that these celebrity soldiers should be punished or judged. It is the system which should be condemned, and not individuals. The were allowed to. Granted, it is unfair of them. However, is it really their fault? If you are granted perks, you just take them, no questions asked. Besides, such differences in hierachies exist in the military, no matter the country you are in. Back in where I live, the sons of ministers and VIPs are actually grouped tgt and they are treated differently, with even their officers/ppl of higher rank having to listen to them and going out in the middle of the night to buy food for them. But the military cater to their every whims. Why are they not grouped with normal people, you say? Then what if the son of your president was killed by accident during a practice session? Who can be accountable for their lives? Is it really as immoral as they say? These people are celebrities, and they werent the ones acting like spoilt brats DEMANDING that they be treated well. But they just are. Can they be faulted for that?

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  30. Although I am not Korean, I have lived in Korea and have had friends that were as close as family leave to the army.
    Thanks for your input though, "Fuck."

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  31. when i was in the military in Korea the Katusa (they are Korean soldiers that work for US Army like a special program they have to pass a English test.) they told me the pay sucks it is not even close to what we get in the states at all.

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  32. Agreed, and tbh i think it's probably something that's very difficult to completely stamp out, this entire hierarchy system thing :/

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